New clinic construction begins

MCHD groundbreaking held last week

Construction is officially underway on the new rural health clinic. A groundbreaking ceremony was held last week to make it official.

Circus returns to delight of kids

Culpepper & Merriweather show held Monday

Much to the delight of over 600 circus attendants, the circus returned to Colorado City on Monday. Many enjoyed the clowns, acrobats and animal acts.

Two arrested in murder, another sought

Cornelius Wingate shot and killed last week

Heather Wilburn and Justin McGowan have been arrested and charged with murder in the shooting death of Cornelius Wingate. Joseph Jason Ybarra south in connection with the shooting.

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  • Organizers are reporting another successful Loraine Farm Sale, the annual fundraiser benefitting the Loraine Volunteer Fire Department. Over 1,000 people showed up at the Loraine Co-Op Gin Yard to help raise funds for the emergency volunteer department. LVFD’s Doyle Mitchell said that the sale grossed nearly $675,000. “Some came to look and visit, while others came to buy,” he said.The concession ...
  • Three students have been chosen as Students of the Week at Hutchinson Elementary. They are Madison Lefler, Jessica Martin and Jose Cruz Rodriquez. Madison is a third grader in Mrs. Torres’ class. Her favorite subject is science. Her hobby is going to grandmas on the weekends. She has a Yorkie named Masy. Her favorite thing about Hutch is AR trips, especially the bowling one. Jessica is a fourth gr...
  • The Hollis Gainey Track at Wolf Stadium will be the site of Thursday’s Lone Wolf Relays. Several high school track teams from around the area will be participating including Snyder, Clyde, Sweetwater, Coahoma, Stanton, Haskell, Roscoe and Colorado City. The recently re-surfaced track will be tested and several have indicated the track may now be one of the best in West Texas. Both boys and girls t...
  • Local law enforcement officials are investigating the murder of 40-year-old Cornelius Wingate, known locally as C-Dub. A shooting occurred on Westpoint Ave. early Thursday morning before 5 a.m. Two suspects have been arrested and a third is being sought in connection with an ongoing murder investigation.On Thursday, March 26th, at approximately 4:55 a.m., officers from the Colorado City Police Dep...
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Steel Will author to speak

coloradocityclipartColorado High School Principal Mark Merrell is pleased to announce an upcoming program to be presented on Wednesday, November 19th in the school’s auditorium at 10 a.m. Shilo Harris, veteran of the U.S. Army, is coming to high school to speak to students and anyone else interested in attending.
A son of a Vietnam veteran, Harris always wanted to be a soldier. After the 9-11 attacks, he enlisted as a Cavalry Scout in the Army. It was on his second deployment that he worked near southern Baghdad on route clearance. On February 19, 2007, the vehicle he was riding in was struck by an IED.
Harris has written a book with the help of Robin Overby Cox, entitled Steel Will: My Journey Through Hell to Become the Man I was Meant to Be. Harris sustained major, life-threatening injuries and still bears the scars from an explosion in Iraq while he served in the U.S. Army.
“Staff Sergeant Harris’ Humbee hit an IED while on patrol in Iraq in February of 2007. In that blast he lost his ears, part of his nose, some fingers and over a third of the skin on his body. He also lost three of his best friends,” his website says. “What followed was an agonizing road to recovery which began with nearly two months in a medically induced coma. During that time he experienced a version of hell so terrifying, the memories still haunt him today.”
The program is sponsored by several businesses and organizations, including Kiwanis Club, City National Bank, Mitchell County Hospital, Rotary Club, First National Bank, C-City Printing, Lions Club, KVMC-KAUM, Colorado City Record, Compass Builders and Mitchell County citizens.
The public is invited to attend the program at high school next Wednesday, and Merrell hopes everyone will make it a point to come out and hear Harris’ inspirational story. Harris will also be signing copies of his books.
For more information, call CHS at 325-728-3424.

Steel Will author to speak

coloradocityclipartColorado High School Principal Mark Merrell is pleased to announce an upcoming program to be presented on Wednesday, November 19th in the school’s auditorium at 10 a.m. Shilo Harris, veteran of the U.S. Army, is coming to high school to speak to students and anyone else interested in attending.
A son of a Vietnam veteran, Harris always wanted to be a soldier. After the 9-11 attacks, he enlisted as a Cavalry Scout in the Army. It was on his second deployment that he worked near southern Baghdad on route clearance. On February 19, 2007, the vehicle he was riding in was struck by an IED.
Harris has written a book with the help of Robin Overby Cox, entitled Steel Will: My Journey Through Hell to Become the Man I was Meant to Be. Harris sustained major, life-threatening injuries and still bears the scars from an explosion in Iraq while he served in the U.S. Army.
“Staff Sergeant Harris’ Humbee hit an IED while on patrol in Iraq in February of 2007. In that blast he lost his ears, part of his nose, some fingers and over a third of the skin on his body. He also lost three of his best friends,” his website says. “What followed was an agonizing road to recovery which began with nearly two months in a medically induced coma. During that time he experienced a version of hell so terrifying, the memories still haunt him today.”
The program is sponsored by several businesses and organizations, including Kiwanis Club, City National Bank, Mitchell County Hospital, Rotary Club, First National Bank, C-City Printing, Lions Club, KVMC-KAUM, Colorado City Record, Compass Builders and Mitchell County citizens.
The public is invited to attend the program at high school next Wednesday, and Merrell hopes everyone will make it a point to come out and hear Harris’ inspirational story. Harris will also be signing copies of his books.
For more information, call CHS at 325-728-3424.

Kimmels report on Samaritan House

lionsclubkimmelBobby and June Kimmel visited the Colorado City Lions Club last Friday to tell about the Samaritan House, a charity the couple started as a way to provide shelter for families visiting offenders at the Wallace/Ware prison complex.
While teaching at the prison in the early 1990s, Kimmel said that many of the guys there often suggested the need for a place for visitors to stay. They spoke of family members sleeping in cars because they could not afford hotel rooms.
Seeing the apparent need, Kimmel started praying and looking into the purchase of old houses to buy, but each time the deal would fall through. Oddly enough, the charity’s future home had already been built by Kimmel himself.
Kimmel constructed the building that houses the Samaritan House for Sun Oil Company many years ago, and it served as the district office in Colorado City for 15 to 20 years. There were 45 rooms which were offices for various managers.
When the oil company left, the building was deeded over to the City of Colorado City. For about 12 years, the city rented it to various types of businesses. After the last business had vacated the premises, city officials decided to put the structure and lot up for auction.
Sun Oil had paid Kimmel $145,000 to construct the office but he only had about $1,000 to spend. He submitted the bid thinking he would never hear a word.
One day, Kimmel got a call from the city, and the official on the other end of the phone said, “You bought yourself a building.” He had been the only bidder, and the city cashed his $1,000 check and gave him the title.
Now he had a building but no money for renovations. He said, “I thanked God and told him that I didn’t have money to fix it up for people to stay.” Pretty soon, Kimmel received a $10,000 check to begin the renovations necessary to turn the office building into a house of sorts.
Some of the congregation members from First Baptist Church in Westbrook contacted Kimmel saying they would like to “do a room”. He said, “OK, but I don’t have any money to furnish it.” They said that they weren’t asking for money, only permission to do the work. Kimmel said that the church brought in several people who volunteered their time and work to totally furnish the room, carpet, paint and all.
As the word began to spread, Kimmel started hearing from churches all over the area. Various church groups came in and renovated 30 rooms, at no cost to Kimmel.
“It’s amazing what people will do, and for no money,” Kimmel said. Each time a challenging situation arose, God provided a solution. Many times, the solution came in the form of volunteers stepping up to help complete strangers.
Before long, the Samaritan House was providing lodging to 1000 people per month. But the house was lacking a few things still.
A lady from Dallas had come to visit one of the prisoners here, and when she returned to her home, she told the congregation of her church about the wonderful, free facility. She suggested that more bathrooms were needed.
The next week, two busloads of people showed up at the Samaritan House and offered to put in more bathrooms. “I don’t have the money for new bathrooms,” Kimmel told them. They said they didn’t ask for money.
Kimmel said that church renovated and constructed the restroom facilities entirely. “It’s been amazing what God has done,” he said. “Every time we needed something, God took care of it.” From the acquisition of the building to the renovations and repairs that continue to arise, God supplies, Kimmel said.
Last year, the Samaritan House provided a place to stay and meals for three days to 3600 visitors. They have come to Colorado City from six foreign countries and 35 states in the U.S. Kimmel said that 20 to 30 women come in every Monday morning to clean, do laundry and get the place ready for the next set of visitors.
Much of the food is purchased through the Abilene Food Bank, and like everything else, it’s always more than enough.
The Kimmels have faced more than a few challenges recently. The place was robbed of $400, DVD players, and other electronics, as well as being torn up by the burglars. Then, a couple of days later, the warehouse caught fire from a gas leak.
Even in the face of tragedy, Kimmel is content. “God has always met our needs,” he said.
Local Lions donated $1,000 to the Samaritan House to be spent as needed, just another example of God using people to provide a solution.

Hunters dinner again successful

huntersnubmorrisOver 440 people enjoyed the barbeque at the Chamber of Commerce’s annual Hunters Appreciation Dinner, held at the Railhead Building last Friday evening. Guns, feeders, youth guns and all types of hunting accessories were given away, much to the delight of the hundreds in attendance.
Chamber Manager Amanda Jo Ritchey deemed the dinner a great success and confirmed that the event is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the organization. She said the proceeds raised go to fund other chamber-sponsored activities throughout the year.
Several businesses in town donated door prizes for the event, and a list of big prize winners follows.
Marlin 336 30-30 - Don Burleson, Fort Worth
Walther PPX S/S 9mm 4” - Julie Bullard, Colorado City
Remington 870 Express 12 ga. 26” - Mike Moore, Seagraves
Beretta TIKKA T3 25-06 - Bryan Beckman, Roanoke
Ruger 10/22 LR Pink - Kayla Beavers, Westbrook
Remington 700 SPS .243 win. - Wayland Moore, Colorado City
Fuller’s Gun - Remington 700 BDL .270 win. - Nub Morris, Colorado City
Big Country Water Sponsored Gun- Marlin X7 .223 Rem. - Brandon Burleson, Lubbock
Savage 14 American Classic 308 win. - Patty Ross, Lubbock
TriStar o/u Extralight 20 ga - Tip Chaney, Colorado City
DEVON Sponsored Gun – Savage Model 10 Precision Carbine .223 Rem. - Skeeter Rivera, Colorado City
Ty Wood Sponsored Gun - Henry Golden Boy 22 LR Youth - Dee Rohmfeld, San Angelo
Ruger 10/22-22 LR - Mike Everett, Colorado City
Red Rock Sponsored Gun – Mossberg 500 Bantam 20 ga Youth - Ronnie Minica, Tucumcari, NM
2 loads of limestone base donated by Loraine Quarry - Ryan Costabile, Colorado City
Yeti Cooler donated by City National Bank - Rocky Gomez
72” Double Top Fire Pit donated by Colorado Feed & Seed - Ty Johnson, Colorado City
Stand & Fill Feeder donated by Chamber, Travis Watson
$600 Mount Donated M&W Wildlife - Dalton Maddox, Colorado City
Quail Feeder Donated by TX Caps & T-Shirts - Jody Beavers, Colorado City
Gator Donated by Colorado City Chamber of Commerce- Bryne Jo Stone

Walkers gives information on SOAR

lionsclubwalkerGary Walker flew into the Colorado City Airport last Friday to speak to the members of the Colorado City Lions Club. Walker lives in Plains where he manages the airport and operates the SOAR weather modification program.
Walker presented a slide show to those attending to help illustrate the process of weather modification, commonly known as cloud seeding. There are several uses for cloud seeding, including hail suppression and seeding to produce more rain which was the topic of discussion Friday.
There are two ways to seed clouds to help produce more rainfall. Warmer parts of the clouds, toward the bottom of the formations, can be seeded with salt, and the cooler upper parts of clouds can be seeded with silver iodide crystals.
Both seeding processes help water droplets stick together, accumulating weight until they are heavy enough to fall as rain.
Walker said that as airplanes fly into the clouds, meteorologists on the ground navigate by radio to help pilots find the correct position before deploying seeding flares. With the help of the Titan radar, meteorologists are able to track each plane as it flies into the clouds.
Over the course of the program, it has been found that seeded clouds grow to cover more area and also produce more rain. Walker said that analysts at Texas Tech University found that seeded clouds could produce up to 68% more rain than could be expected out of a normal pattern.
In March of 2014, the City of Wichita Falls contracted with the SOAR program to seed clouds forming over the watershed of the city’s surface water sources. Walker said that SOAR only seeded clouds moving into the correct area to produce rain over the watershed.
He said that there is about two million acres of land in the watershed, and analysts estimated the cloud seeding upped precipitation by about 15% over the months of the contract.
“Listen, cloud seeding is no silver bullet, but it can help produce suitable rain,” Walker said. He said that seeding makes clouds last longer, while producing more precipitation.
Permits for the program are issued by the Texas Department of Licensing, and there are many rules and regulations that operators must abide by. For instance, Walker said planes can no longer fly into clouds where warnings are issued for a severe thunderstorm or hail.
In Canada and South America, insurance companies contract with SOAR to fly into clouds to seed them with hail suppression particles. This kind of cloud seeding is often seen in areas where vineyards are insured.
Five counties to the south of Wichita Falls area formed a Rolling Plains Co-Op and contracted with SOAR for cloud seeding. Walker estimated the counties paid $44,000 to $45,000 per month to participate.

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